Thierry Magin


T. MaginAssociate Professor
Aeronautics & Aerospace department

+32 2 359 96 38

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The European Research Council (ERC) has granted one of its prestigious Starting Independent Researcher Grants to a professor at the von Karman Institute. Thierry Magin, Assistant Professor in the AR Department, has won a €1.5 million individual ERC Starting Grant for building a research team to work from September 2010 over the next five years on the project "Aerospacephys: multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows applied to the space exploration program".

Website of the project: https://www.vki.ac.be/aerospacephys/

Biography

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D. in Applied Sciences (with the highest distinction), Free University of Brussels, Belgium, 2004.
  • MSc. in Fluid Dynamics (with honors), von Karman Institute, Belgium, 1999.
  • Engineer in Physics (graduate with the highest distinction), University of  Liège, Belgium, 1998.

 

CAREER

  • 2013 - present: Associate Professor, von Karman Institute.
  • 2013 - present: Invited Associate Professor –, University of Liège
  • 2013 - present: Professor – Ecole Centrale Paris
  • 2011-2012: Invited Assistant Professor –, University of Liège
  • 2010-2010: Visiting Assistant Professor – School of Engineering, Stanford University
  • 2009-2012: Assistant Professor von Karman Institute.
  • 2006-2009: Postdoctoral Research Fellow –, Stanford University and NASA Ames Research Center
  • 2006-2006: CNRS Associate Research Fellow, von Karman Institute.
  • 2004-2005: Senior Research Engineer –von Karman Institute.
  • 2004-2005: Senior Research Engineer –von Karman Institute,
  • 1999-2004: Researcher – von Karman Institute

 

AWARDS and MEMBERSHIPS

  • Fundamentals on Aerothermodynamics” award attributed by the European Space Agency, 2011
  • Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
  • Member of the Discussion Group on “Nonequilibrium” of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
  • Member of the technical committee for the European Symposium on Aerothermodynamics for Space Vehicles.

 

SERVICE TO SOCIETY

Organizer and chairman of sessions on:

  • Co-host of the hypersonics group at the 2008 Summer Program of the Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University - NASA Ames Research Center.
  • Host of the hypersonics group at the 2010 Summer Program of the Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University - NASA Ames Research Center.
  • Co-organiser of the working group on “Non-equilibrium gas kinetics and gas-surface interaction for aerothermodynamic applications,” NASA Ames Research Center.

Teaching

FORMAL COURSES

  • Hypersonic Flow” of Professor Bob MacCormack (at Stanford University 10 hours, graduate students) 2009.
  • Physical Gas Dynamics” (von Karman Institute part of 4 ECTS).
  • Introduction to plasma physics and reentry of space vehicles,” (University of Liège 5 ECTS).

LECTURER AT SPECIAL COURSES:

  • Hypersonic Flow, course at Stanford University.
  • Kinetic and transport theory of plasmas, Course on Hypersonic Entry and Cruise Vehicles, Chazot, O.; Magin, T. E., Stanford, California, USA, VKI CW 2008-01, 2008.
  • Kinetic theory of plasmas, Course on Hypersonic Entry and Cruise Vehicles, Chazot, O.; Magin, T. E., Rhode-Saint-Genèse, Belgium, RTO-EN-AVT-162, 2008.
  • Multiscale Chapman-Enskog method for continuum plasmas in translational thermal nonequilibrium, Aerothermodynamics Days, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Rhode-Saint-Genèse, Belgium, 11/2009.

INVITED LECTURER AT:

  • Transport properties and algorithms for partially ionized plasmas, Symposium on Diffusion, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Endhoven, The Netherlands, 10/2004.
  • Modeling of high temperature flows, Research seminar, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden Germany, 03/2006.
  • A model for inductive plasma wind tunnels, Research seminar, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, USA, 11/2006.
  • Physico-chemical models for high enthalpy and plasma flows, Predictive Engineering and Computational Sciences seminar, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, 04/2009. School of Engineering, The University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA, 09/2009.
  • Kinetic theory for continuum plasmas, Research seminar, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland, 01/2009. Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA, 08/2009. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, 09/2009.
  • Chapman-Enskog method for plasmas - Translational energy, ESA Working Group on Kinetic Theory, Institut Henry Poincaré, Paris, France, 10/2009.
  • Hypersonics: overview, 13th Biennial Summer Program of the Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, 07/2010.
  • Multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows applied to the space exploration program, Research seminar, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Royal Military Academy, Brussels, Belgium, 04/2010. Laboratory, Ecole Centrale Paris, Châtenay-Malabry, France. 09/2010, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, USA, 09/2010. Institute of Space Systems, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, 09/2010. Astrium Space Transportation, Saint Médard en Jalles, France 11/2010. University of Bari, Bari, Italy, 12/2010. University of Liège, Liège, Belgium, 01/2011.
  • Rovibrational internal energy excitation and dissociation of molecular nitrogen in hypersonic flows, Prof. Capitelli's symposium on the occasion of his 70th birthday, Bari, Italy, 01/2011.
  • Sound scaling and perturbation method for the kinetic theory of dilute gases with internal degrees of freedom, ESA Working Group on Kinetic Theory, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy, 01/2011.
  • Review of the VKI research on nonequilibrium phenomena in hypersonics, Major Efforts in Nonequilibrium Flows session, 50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, 01/2012.
  • Kinetic theory derivation of nonequilibrium hydrodynamic models for atmospheric entry plasmas, Math/ICES Center of Numerical Analysis Seminars, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, 01/2012.
  • Cooled Pitot probe in inductive air plasma jet: What do we measure? Fluids Seminar, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, 01/2012. Seminar on Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Fluid Dynamics and Technical Acoustics, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, 05/2012.
  • Ionization phenomena in hypersonic shock layer, International School of Quantum Electronics, 53rd course: Molecular physics and plasmas in hypersonics II, Erice, Italy, 09/2012.
  • Multicomponent transport algorithms for plasmadynamics models, ICES seminar Numerical Analysis series, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 01/2013.
  • Rebuilding free stream conditions for atmospheric entries, Aerothermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics seminar, Aerospace Engineering Department, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 01/2013.
  • Multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows, Atmospheric Reentry Physics Gordon Research Conference, Ventura, California, USA, 02/2013.

Research

MAIN RESEARCH INTEREST

  • Hypersonics, atmospheric entry flows, rarefied gas dynamics
  • Multiphysics models and numerical methods for reacting and plasma ?ows: detailed chemistry and nonequilibrium radiation, gas-surface interactions
  • Uncertainty Quantification for aerospace applications
  • Transport phenomena, Kinetic theory, Chapman-Enskog method, Boltzmann-moment systems, Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

Grants:

  • AFOSR FA8655-08-1-3070 Grant, “Advanced physical modeling for hypersonic applications,” submitted by the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, PI: O. Chazot.
  • STTR AF08-T019 Grant, “Efficient kinetic/continuum simulations of hypervelocity gas flows in nonequilibrium dissociation and ionization for Earth atmosphere,” submitted by CASCADE Technologies and Stanford University, PI: P. Moin.
  • AFOSR FA8655-10-1-3076, "Advanced physical models and numerical methods for high enthalpy and plasma flows applied to hypersonics," PI: T. Magin.
  • ERC Starting Grant 259354, “AEROSPACEPHYS: Multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows applied to the space exploration program,” PI: T. Magin.
  • European Space Agency Technology Research Program AO /1-6938/11/NL/SFE, “UQ4AERO: Uncertainty Quantification for Aerospace Applications,” PI: T. Magin.
  • Astrium Space Transportation, “Ablation testing in the VKI Plasmatron,” PI: T. Magin.
  • Astrium Space Transportation, “Radiative and ablative studies for in-Flight validation of reentry platforms,” PI: T. Magin.

Participation in research projects:

  • Collaborated with researchers of the Institute for Problems in Mechanics and the State University of Moscow.  The experimental facilities and numerical models were used to determine the catalytic properties of thermal protection materials used for several ESA missions
  • Participated in the Mars research program of the French Space Agency (CNES). A kinetic database for the transport properties of carbon dioxide was developed in collaboration with the late Professor Sokolova (Institute for Mathematical Modeling, Moscow) and is currently used in CFD codes of NASA and ESA
  • Appointed in the last phase of the Cassini-Huygens mission to assess the influence of nonequilibrium radiation effects on the heat fluxes on the thermal protection shield of the Huygens probe during its descent into the atmosphere of Titan
  • Derived a fluid model for plasmas based on kinetic theory and developed a collisional-radiative model of air for atmospheric reentries (Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle program of NASA).
  • Collaborated with applied mathematicians at Ecole Centrale Paris and Paris-Sud University on a project: “Analysis and multiscale problem simulations.”
  • Derived a model for rarefied plasmas in the transitional regime based on the Boltzmann moment method (Hypersonic Technology Vehicle program of the US Air Force).
  • Obtained funding for distribution of the Mutation library for high enthalpy and plasma flows through a grant from the US Air Force. This library has been interfaced with many research CFD codes and is widely used, together with the Shocking code, in Europe, Australia, and the USA. In particular, two of the five centers sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program utilize this library (Stanford and UT Austin).

Expert:

  • Modeling of transport phenomena, European Space Agency, Technical Research Program on Aerothermochemistry, 2003-2004.
  • Collisional-radiative models, European Space Agency, working group on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, 2006

Publications

Download the complete list of Publications of Prof. T. Magin

  1. Blackout analysis of small reentry vehicles.Ramjatan, S.; Scholz, Th.; Van der Haegen, V.; Magin, T. E.; Thoemel, J., Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 2016, accepted for publication.
  2. Mono-dimensional analysis of the MagnetoHydrodynamic effect in Rotating Detonation Combustors. Braun, J.; Saracoglu, B. H.; Magin, T. E.; Paniagua, G., AIAA Journal, 2016, accepted for publication.
  3. Experimental investigation of ablation and pyrolysis processes of carbon-phenolic ablators in atmospheric entry plasmas. Helber, B.; Turchi, A.; Scoggins, J. B.; Hubin, A.; Magin, T. E., International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 2016, 100, pp. 810–824.
  4. Fully implicit discontinuous galerkin solver to study surface and volume ablation competition in atmospheric entry flows. Schrooyen, P.; Hillewaert, K.; Magin, T. E., Chatelain, Ph., International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 2016, accepted for publication.
  5. Flow-radiation coupling for atmospheric entries using a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band model. Soucasse, L.; Scoggins, J. B.; Rivière, Ph.; Magin, T. E., Soufiani, A., Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer, 2016, 180, pp. 55–69.
  6. Emission spectroscopic boundary layer investigation during ablative material testing in plasmatron. Helber, B.; Hubin, A.; Chazot, O.; Magin, T. E., Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2016, accepted for publication.
  7. Gibbs function continuation method for linearly constrained multiphase equilibria. Scoggins, J. B. and Magin, T. E., Combustion and Flame, 2015, 162, 4514.
  8. Detailed chemical equilibrium model for porous ablative materials. Lachaud, J.; van Eekelen, Tom; Scoggins, J. B.; Magin, T. E.; Mansour, N. N., International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 2015, 90, 1034.
  9. Reduction of a collisional-radiative mechanism for argon plasma based on principal component analysis. Bellemans, A.; Magin, T. E.; Munafò, A.; Degrez, G.; Parente, Al., Physics of Plasmas, 2015, 22, 062108.
  10. Microstructure and gas-surface interaction studies of a low-density carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite in atmospheric entry plasmas. Helber, B.; Hubin, A.; Chazot, O.; Magin, T. E., Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 2015, 72, 96.
  11. Study of the non-equilibrium shock heated nitrogen flows using a rovibrational state-to-state method. Panesi, M.; Munafò, A.; Magin, T. E.; Jaffe, R. L., Physical Review E, 2014, 90, 013009.
  12. Modeling of stagnation-line nonequilibrium flows by means of quantum based collisional models. Munafò, A.; Magin, T. E., Physics of Fluids 2014, 26, 097102.
  13. Material response characterization of a low-density carbon composite ablator in high-enthalpy plasma flows. Helber, B.; Asma, C., O.; Babou, Y.; Hubin, A.; Chazot, O.; Magin, T. E., Journal Materials Sciences, 2014, 49, pp. 4530–4543.
  14. Comparison of Titan entry radiation shock-tube data with collisional-radiative models. Brandis, A., M.; Laux, Ch., O.; Magin, T. E.; Mcintyre, T., J.; Morgan, R., G., Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 2014, 28, 32.
  15. Bayesian-based method with metamodels for rebuilding freestream conditions in atmospheric conditions in atmospheric entry flows. Tryoen, J.; Congedo, P.; Abgrall, R.; Villedieu, N.; Magin, T. E., AIAA Journal, 2014, 52, 2190.
  16. A spectral-Lagrangian Boltzmann solver for a multi-energy level gas. Munafó, A.; Haack, J. R.; Gamba, I. M.; Magin, T. E., Journal of Computational Physics, 2014, 264, 152.
  17. Direct numerical simulations of hypersonic boundary-layer transition with finite-rate chemistry. Marxen, O.; Iaccarino, G.; Magin, T. E., Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2014, 755, pp. 35-49.
  18. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows. Munafó, A.; Panesi, M.; Magin, T. E., Physical Review E, 2014, 89, 023001.
  19. Reduction of state-to-state to macroscopic models for hypersonics. Bourdon, A.; Annaloro, J.; Bultel, A.; Capitelli, M.; Colonna, G.; Guy, A.; Magin, T. E.; Munafò, A.; Perrin, M.-Y.; Pietanza, L. D., The Open Plasma Physics Journal, 2014, 7, pp. 60-75.
  20. A method for the direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary-layer instability with finite-rate chemistry. Marxen, O.; Magin,T. E.; Shaqfeh, E.S.G.; Iaccarino, G., Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 255, December 2013, pp. 572–589
  21. Rovibrational energy excitation and dissociation of molecular nitrogen in a compressing flow. Panesi, M.; Magin, T.E.. Jaffe, R.; Schwenke, D.W.,The Journal of Chemical Physics, 2013, Vol. 138, pp 044312
  22. QCT-based vibrational collisional models applied to nonequilibrium nozzle flow.
    Munafó, A.; Panesi, M.; Jaffe, R.L., Colonna, G., Bourdon, A.; Magin, T.E., The European Physical Journal D, 2012, 66, 188.
  23. Coarse-graining model for internal energy excitation and dissociation of molecular nitrogen.
    Magin, Thierry E.; Panesi, Marco; Bourdon, Anne; Jaffe, Richard L.; Schwenke, David W., Chemical Physics, 2011, 398, 90.
  24. A high-order numerical method to study hypersonic boundary layer instability including high temperature effects.
    Marxen, Olaf; Magin, Thierry E.; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Erik, S. G., Physics of Fluids, 2011, 23, 084108.
  25. Electronic excitation of atoms and molecules for the FIRE II flight experiment.
    Panesi, Marco; Magin, Thierry E.; Bourdon, Anne; Bultel, Arnaud; Chazot, Olivier, Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 2011, 25, 361.
  26. Construction of low dissipative high-order well-balanced filter schemes for non-equilibrium flow.
    Wang, Wei; Yee, H.C.; Sjögreen, Björn; Magin, Thierry; Shu, Chi-Wang, Journal of Computational Physics, 2011, 230, 4316.
  27. Multicomponent transport in weakly ionized mixtures.
    *Giovangigli, Vincent; Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry; Massot, Marc, Plasma Sources Science and Technology, 2010, 19, 034002.
  28. Kinetic theory of plasmas: translational energy.
    *Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry E.; Massot, Marc, Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences, 2009, 19 (4), 527.
  29. Analysis of the FIRE II flight experiment by means of a collisional radiative model.
    Panesi, Marco; Magin, Thierry E.; Bourdon, Anne; Bultel, Arnaud; Chazot, Olivier, Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 2009, 23(2), 236.
  30. Transport properties of collision-dominated dilute perfect gas mixtures at low pressures and high temperatures.
    Bottin, Benoît; Vanden Abeele, David; Magin, Thierry E.; Rini, Pietro, Progress in Aerospace Sciences, 2006, 42(1), 38.
  31. Radiative heating predictions for Huygens entry.
    Caillault, Lise; Walpot, Louis; Magin, Thierry E.; Bourdon, Anne; Laux, Christophe O., Journal of Geophysical Research Planets, 2006, 111, E09S90.
  32. Overview of the coordinated ground-based observations of Titan during the Huygens mission,
    Witasse, Olivier, et al. (including Magin, Thierry E.), Journal of Geophysical Research Planets, 2006, 111, E07S01.
  33. Nonequilibrium radiative heat flux modeling for the Huygens entry probe.
    Magin, Thierry E.; Caillault, Lise; Bourdon, Anne; Laux, Christophe O., Journal of Geophysical Research Planets, 2006, 111, E07S12.
  34. Transport algorithms for partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas.
    Magin, Thierry E.; Degrez, Gérard, Journal of Computational Physics, 2004, 198(2), 424.
  35. Transport properties of partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas.
    Magin, Thierry E.; Degrez, Gérard, Physical Review E, 2004, 70(4), 046412.
  36. A decade of aerothermal plasma research at the von Karman Institute.
    Bottin, Benoît; Carbonaro, Mario; Chazot, Olivier; Degrez, Gérard; Vanden Abeele, David; Barbante, Paolo; Paris, Sébastien; Van Der Haegen, Vincent; Magin, Thierry; Playez, Mickaël, Contributions to Plasma Physics, 2004, 44(5-6), 472.
  37. Numerical simulation of nonequilibrium stagnation-line CO2 flows with catalyzed surface reactions.
    Rini, Pietro; García, Antonio; Magin, Thierry; Degrez, Gérard, Journal of Thermophysics and Heat Transfer, 2004, 18(1), 114.

*Authors listed by alphabetical order, following the convention used in the French applied

ERC Description

The European Research Council stimulates scientific excellence by supporting and encouraging the very best, truly creative scientists, scholars and engineers to be adventurous and take risks in their research. The scientists are encouraged to go beyond established frontiers of knowledge and the boundaries of disciplines. ERC grants are awarded through open competition to projects headed by starting and established researchers - the sole criterion for selection is scientific excellence. The aim here is to recognise the best ideas, and retain and confer status and visibility to the best brains in Europe, while also attracting talent from abroad.

The project ERC-2010-StG_259354 is entitled AEROSPACEPHYS—Multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows applied to the space exploration program.

The proposed research aims at: "Integrating new advanced physico-chemical models and computational methods, based on a multidisciplinary approach developed together with physicists, chemists, and applied mathematicians, to create a top-notch multiphysics and multiscale numerical platform for simulations of planetary atmosphere entries, crucial to the new challenges of the manned space exploration program. Experimental data will also be used for validation, following state-of-the-art uncertainty quantification methods."

Space exploration is one of the boldest and most exciting endeavors that humanity has undertaken and holds enormous promise for the future. After the successful manned missions to the Moon and many probe entries into the atmosphere of outer planets, our next challenges include bringing samples back to Earth by means of robotic missions, as well as continuing the manned space exploration program to send human beings to Mars and bring them home safely. Inaccurate prediction of the heat load on the surface of a spacecraft may be fatal for the crew or the success of robotic missions. Rocket scientists estimate this quantity during the design phase for the heat shield, which is used to protect payload and astronauts. To help them with this estimation, the AEROSPACEPHYS team has investigated the following mission killers: 1) Radiation of the hot dissociated plasma in front of the vehicle, 2) Complex degradation, or ablation, of the thermal protection material, 3) Flow transition from “smooth” laminar regime to turbulent regime. The PI and his team demonstrated that a poor understanding of the coupling between the radiation, ablation, and transition phenomena can lead to severe errors in the heat load prediction.
To avoid space mission failure and ensure safety of the astronauts and payload, aerospace engineers resort to safety factors by increasing the heat shield thickness at the expense of reduced mass of embarked payload. Determination of safety factors relies on a discipline called uncertainty quantification that aims here at developing rigorous methods to characterize the impact of “limited knowledge” on the heat load. The design of the Apollo, Galileo and Huygens probes are famous examples of “lucky” heat shield design based on inaccurate simulations. A possible explanation is that the conventional physico-chemical models used for entry simulations are often stretched dangerously and used out of the validity range for which they have been conceived. Thinking out of the box and conducting basic research were thus necessary for advancements of the models that will define the environment and requirements for the design and safe operation of tomorrow’s space vehicles and planetary probes for the manned space exploration.

Let us recall the three basic ingredients for predictive engineering: 1) Physico-chemical models, 2) Computational methods, 3) Experimental data. The team has integrated new advanced physico-chemical models and computational methods, based on a multidisciplinary approach
developed together with engineers, chemists and applied mathematicians. One successful outcome of the AEROSPACEPHYS project was the development of a new software library called MUTATION++: MUlticomponent Thermodynamic And Transport properties for IONized gases
written in C++. This library packages the state-of-the-art physico-chemical models, algorithms and data developed into a highly extensible and robust software designed to be coupled to simulation tools used by space agencies and industries. In particular, new physico-chemical models on the rotation-vibration energy transfer and dissociation of nitrogen molecules in atmospheric entry flows have been derived at the interface between computational chemistry and computational fluid dynamics.

The AEROSPACEPHYS team and its collaborators have also developed multiphysics and multiscale numerical platforms interfaced to the MUTATION++ library to simulate planetary atmosphere entries, crucial to the new challenges of the manned space exploration program. The team pioneered the use of uncertainty quantification tools in aerospace applications for the prediction of flow transition from laminar to turbulent, as well as for model validation based on experimental data obtained in aerospace facilities. The research focused on the needs of the space agencies, benefitting from a long research experience at the host institution, the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, in supporting aerospace missions. In particular, a close collaboration with the aerospace industry led to the identification of intricate coupling mechanisms between the flow, radiation, and material fields allowing us to accurately predict the complex degradation of a new generation of low-density carbon-resin composite materials that will enable tomorrow’s space journeys.

The project ERC-2015-PoC713726, MUTX is entitled MUTATION++ library, technology transfer from atmospheric entry plasmas to biomass pyrolysis

One successful outcome of the AEROSPACEPHYS ERC StG, entitled “Multiphysics models and simulations for reacting and plasma flows applied to the space exploration program,” is the development of a new software library called MUTATION++: MUlticomponent Thermodynamic And Transport properties for IONized gases in C++. The library compiles the state-of-the-art physico-chemical models and algorithms developed by the team into a highly extensible and robust software package to be coupled to simulation tools used by space agencies and industries. The design of the library allows for high-performance integration in material and flow field simulation tools. MUTATION++ is also shipped with several stand-alone tools that provide up-to-date basic data without proper software linking. Such a compromise allows simulation tool users, who do not have access to the source code, to benefit from these models. Taking community development to the next level requires the improvement and enrichment of the software testing framework and database, giving new users development guidelines and technology transfer examples. The MUTX project will allow us to extend the user base of MUTATION++ to the corporate community. This will require the implementation of tests to ensure the preservation of the library functionalities and performance after each new release and on multiple hardware and software platforms. It will also require the addition of databases for real thermal protection materials currently being developed by the space industry in collaboration with the European Space Agency. The demonstration of a transdisciplinary technology transfer will be achieved by implementing a database for biomass pyrolysis simulation. One long-term goal of the MUTX project is to enable the PI and his team to obtain additional funding through participation in research contracts in collaboration with industrial partners using MUTATION++.

News

Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron video
Bernd Helber, Olivier Chazot, Annick Hubin, Thierry E. Magin
Jove, Date Published: 6/09/2016, Issue 112; doi: 10.3791/53742

Electric deep-space engines could bring humankind to Mars
Horizon, By Steve Gillman, 14 March 2016

Developing Aerospace Modeling Tools for Tomorrow’s Space Journeys
Newsletter of the VKI Alumni Association, Issue 12, October 2013, pp 6-8 

 
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